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    Advantages Of Java Web Development caters the widest need of all businesses and is capable of developing programs and codes for even the most unique or complex scenarios. Therefore, it is accepted as a supreme language for expanding or developing applications. Let us first throw limelight on the major advantages of JAVA Web development- 1.Learning JAVA is Easy Even if one has no programming background and has never learned introductory programming languages like C++, learning the concepts of JAVA wouldn’t be a barrier. Without the necessity to use and understand magic characters like Generics Angle Brackets etc., JAVA promotes English syntax and commands instead. Once the initial lessons are caught hold, the rest often becomes easier. 2.Uses OOPS Concept Applications that are developed using the OOPS (Object Oriented Programming) concept of JAVA are more competent as they are extensible, scalable and flexible. It has a rich library of default design patterns and other best practices. 3.Platform Independent Since the time JAVA has gained popularity, i.e. from the 1990s, its Platform Independent nature has made it a highly demanded technology. This feature has made it complement the tagline “Write Once Run Anywhere” in the true sense as it has opened doors to many new developments. If you want to learn more about advantages of Java for web development you can visit at-Advantages Of Java Web Development So, if you want to become a good and successful web developer you must have good knowledge of java programming. If you want to learn java programming then join government certification course in java programming which is conducted by ETL Labs Pvt. Ltd. at Gomtinagar Lucknow. As this institute is an authorized UPdesco (a govt of UP undertaking) education center, so this Java certification program is verifiable at State Govt Office and website. For more information about ETL Labs Pvt. Ltd. you can visit us at- http://etleducation.com/ Advantages Of Java Web Development caters the widest need of all businesses and is c
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    HATHA YOGA WHAT IS HATHA YOGA Hatha yoga is a popular yoga choice in today's fitness community. Groups and individuals use this ancient, classic yoga style to get fit and encourage a healthy mind-body connection. As a traditionally established type of yoga, Hatha yoga sometimes lends its historical weight to other more modern styles. For example, the yoga form known as Anusara yoga, established in the late 20th century by a man named John Friend, uses Hatha yoga as the basis for many of its activities and ideas. It's likely that beginning yoga participants will find elements of Hatha yoga in their group or individual sessions, or in translated handbooks disseminated to a Western audience. ORIGIN OF HATHA YOGA According to some practitioners, Hatha yoga dates back to the 15th century. Scholars refer to a treatise or publication known as the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, where some elements of Hatha yoga are indicated. Hatha yoga was a specific type of yoga activity that, in earlier times, prepared participants for meditating for a very long time. MEANING OF HATHA YOGA Hatha yoga is sometimes called a "dual" type of yoga because it includes a duality between two opposites: the sun (in Hindi, "ha") and the moon ("tha"). Some who practice Hatha yoga call it a "yoking" yoga as it joins these two opposites together. This main established principle for Hatha yoga leads to specific structured poses and other activities that help with body and mind "purification" through principles like asana (postures), pranayama (subtle energy control) and more. Hatha yoga includes the concept of multiple "limbs" or areas of the yoga practice. Where some common yoga forms such as Ashtanga yoga are built on eight limbs, Hatha yoga, according to experts, is often based on six, each of which represent a critical component of the whole, whether it has to do with keeping ready the mind for meditation, controlling breathing or focusing on another particular task. If you want to watch the demonstration o fadvanced traditional Hatha Yoga you must watch this video- https://youtu.be/_ckvBL-erGU?t=17 BENEFITS OF HATHA YOGA Those who take the time to study this ancient yoga art understand that there are some specific benefits of becoming adept at practicing Hatha yoga style. One of the main ones stems from one of the pillars of the Hatha style: breathing. Controlling breath can help improve oxygenation of the body and alleviate stress in some forms. Other elements of Hatha yoga also help with relaxing the body and fighting the stresses of the modern world. As a historical preparation for intensive meditation, Hatha yoga has a lot to offer a modern Western audience. 1.Maintaining a healthy body Hatha Yoga helps in losing weight and it not only looses extra weight but also provides the internal strength, thereby improving metabolism and strengthening immune system. Breathing helps in maintaining a healthy mind which is mentally and emotionally well balanced. 2.Stress Reliever It can be a great stress reliever and is helpful in detoxifying mind and body. After a tiring day at work or at school, try one or two repetitions of Suryanamaskar followed by some deep breathing. You will immediately notice a sense of calmness. To know how to do Suryanamaskar or Sun Salutation you can go through this website- https://healthnbodytips.com 3.Flow of energy or Prana Prana is a type of energy in the human body. It means ‘Universal life Force’. Each human being is born with a certain amount of energy which is responsible for the body’s life, growth and maintenance. Excess usage of this energy makes the body weak. Breathing techniques and Hatha yoga helps in regulating and maintaining this vital form of energy, hence increasing the longevity of life. 4. Improves flexibility Flexibility is very important in maintaining an agile and supple body. Inflexible muscles can lead to bad body posture, back ache, knee discomfort and neck pain. By practicing yoga regularly, body posture is corrected and muscles become flexible. Attaining difficult yoga postures also become easy. 5. Builds muscle strength & Improves Balance Healthy muscles allow us to move freely and keep our body strong. Building muscle strength helps in keeping joints in good shape preventing various diseases like arthritis. Strong muscles also help in maintaining the balance of the body especially during old age. So yoga practice makes your muscle strong. 6. Helps you focus Do you face difficulty in focusing or in concentrating on your work, lecture or class then you must try Hatha yoga! Holding asanas require focus and deep breathing in order to balance the body, thereby making the mind more alert and sharp. 7. Increases blood flow Asanas or yoga posture encourages blood to flow from legs to the heart, and later pumps it to the lungs for it to oxygenate, making one feel energetic and refreshed after his/her practice. Knowing more about Hatha yoga will help fitness beginners see more about how this traditional yoga practice informs newer yoga styles and brings a lot of authentic principles to a yoga routine. To learn more about Hatha Yoga and to become physically and mentally fit you can join 200 Hours Hatha yoga training course conducted by Yoga Vedanta at Rishikesh- Yoga capital of the world. For more information and to get registered in the 200 Hours yoga teacher training by Yoga Vedanta you can go through this website- http://yoga-vedanta.in
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    YOGA SUTRAS OF PATANJALI ORIGIN OF YOGA SUTRAS Once upon a time, long ago, all the Munis and Rishis approached Lord Vishnu to tell him that even though he (incarnated as Lord Dhanvanthari) had given him the means to cure illnesses through Ayurveda, people still fell ill. They also wanted to know what to do when people got sick. Sometimes it is not just physical illness, but mental and emotional illness too that needs to be dealt with. How does one get rid of all these illness? What is the formula? Vishnu was lying on the bed of snakes — the serpent Adishésha with a 1, 000 heads. When the Rishis approached Him, He gave them Adishésha (the symbol of awareness), who took birth in the world as Maharishi Patanjali. Hence Patanjali came to this earth to give this knowledge of yoga which came to be known as the Yoga Sutras. The suras are considered as the words of wisdom and inspiration. Exploring Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra is a first step in seeing how yoga is beneficial for us. Yoga connects you to the authentic information and an enhanced understanding of the ancient writings that continue to provide valuable yoga knowledge today. ABOUT YOGA SUTRAS The work is divided into four chapters, chapter1 (51 sutras) known as Samadhi, chapter2 (55 sutras) known as sadhana, chapter3 (56 sutras) known as vibhuti, chapter4 (34 sutras) known as kaivalya. If we talk about Samadhi various kinds of Samadhi are mentioned. However there are only two categories of Samadhi- Sabija (with seed) and Nirbija (without seed). Sabija Samadhi in its own turn of six kinds- samprajnata, asamprajnata, savitarka, nirvitarka, savicara, nirvicara depending on the object of experience of awareness. Chapter1 ends up in 51 sutras by clarifying that seedless awareness is obtained by blocking of all cittavrittis. These 51 sutras are- 1.1 Now, after having done prior preparation through life and other practices, the study and practice of Yoga begins. 1.2 Yoga is the control (nirodhah, regulation, channeling, mastery, integration, coordination, stilling, quieting, setting aside) of the modifications (gross and subtle thought patterns) of the mind field. 1.3 Then the Seer abides in Itself, resting in its own True Nature, which is called Self-realization. 1.4 At other times, when one is not in Self-realization, the Seer appears to take on the form of the modifications of the mind field, taking on the identity of those thought patterns. Un-coloring your thoughts (Yoga Sutras 1.5-1.11) 1.5 Those gross and subtle thought patterns (vrittis) fall into five varieties, of which some are colored (klishta) and others are uncolored (aklishta). 1.6 The five varieties of thought patterns to witness are: 1) knowing correctly (pramana), 2) incorrect knowing (viparyaya), 3) fantasy or imagination (vikalpa), 4) the object of void-ness that is deep sleep (nidra), and 5) recollection or memory (smriti). 1.7 Of these five, there are three ways of gaining correct knowledge (pramana): 1) perception, 2) inference, and 3) testimony or verbal communication from others who have knowledge. 1.8 Incorrect knowledge or illusion (viparyaya) is false knowledge formed by perceiving a thing as being other than what it really is. 1.9 Fantasy or imagination (vikalpa) is a thought pattern that has verbal expression and knowledge, but for which there is no such object or reality in existence. 1.10 Dreamless sleep (nidra) is the subtle thought pattern which has as its object an inertia, blankness, absence, or negation of the other thought patterns (vrittis). 1.11 Recollection or memory (smriti) is mental modification caused by the inner reproducing of a previous impression of an object, but without adding any other characteristics from other sources. Practice and non-attachment (Yoga Sutras 1.12-1.16) 1.12 These thought patterns (vrittis) are mastered (nirodhah, regulated, coordinated, controlled, stilled, quieted) through practice (abhyasa) and non-attachment (vairagya). 1.13 Practice (abhyasa) means choosing, applying the effort, and doing those actions that bring a stable and tranquil state (sthitau). 1.14 When that practice is done for a long time, without a break, and with sincere devotion, then the practice becomes a firmly rooted, stable and solid foundation. 1.15 When the mind loses desire even for objects seen or described in a tradition or in scriptures, it acquires a state of utter (vashikara) desirelessness that is called non-attachment (vairagya). 1.16 Indifference to the subtlest elements, constituent principles, or qualities themselves (gunas), achieved through a knowledge of the nature of pure consciousness (purusha), is called supreme non-attachment (paravairagya). Types of concentration (Yoga Sutras 1.17-1.18) 1.17 The deep absorption of attention on an object is of four kinds, 1) gross (vitarka), 2) subtle (vichara), 3) bliss accompanied (ananda), and 4) with I-ness (asmita), and is called samprajnata samadhi. 1.18 The other kind of samadhi is asamprajnata samadhi, and has no object in which attention is absorbed, wherein only latent impressions remain; attainment of this state is preceded by the constant practice of allowing all of the gross and subtle fluctuations of mind to recede back into the field from which they arose. Efforts and commitment (Yoga Sutras 1.19-1.22) 1.19 Some who have attained higher levels (videhas) or know unmanifest nature (prakritilayas), are drawn into birth in this world by their remaining latent impressions of ignorance, and more naturally come to these states of samadhi. 1.20 Others follow a five-fold systematic path of 1) faithful certainty in the path, 2) directing energy towards the practices, 3) repeated memory of the path and the process of stilling the mind, 4) training in deep concentration, and 5) the pursuit of real knowledge, by which the higher samadhi (asamprajnata samadhi) is attained. 1.21 Those who pursue their practices with intensity of feeling, vigor, and firm conviction achieve concentration and the fruits thereof more quickly, compared to those of medium or lesser intensity. 1.22 Because the methods may be applied in slow, medium, or speedy ways, even among those who have such commitment and conviction, there are differences in the rate of progress, resulting in nine grades of practice. Direct route through AUM (Yoga Sutras 1.23-1.29) 1.23 From a special process of devotion and letting go into the creative source from which we emerged (ishvara pranidhana), the coming of samadhi is imminent. 1.24 That creative source (ishvara) is a particular consciousness (purusha) that is unaffected by colorings (kleshas), actions (karmas), or results of those actions that happen when latent impressions stir and cause those actions. 1.25 In that pure consciousness (ishvara) the seed of omniscience has reached its highest development and cannot be exceeded. 1.26 From that consciousness (ishvara) the ancient-most teachers were taught, since it is not limited by the constraint of time. 1.27 The sacred word designating this creative source is the sound OM, called pranava. 1.28 This sound is remembered with deep feeling for the meaning of what it represents. 1.29 From that remembering comes the realization of the individual Self and the removal of obstacles. Obstacles and solutions (Yoga Sutras 1.30-1.32) 1.30 Nine kinds of distractions come that are obstacles naturally encountered on the path, and are physical illness, tendency of the mind to not work efficiently, doubt or indecision, lack of attention to pursuing the means of samadhi, laziness in mind and body, failure to regulate the desire for worldly objects, incorrect assumptions or thinking, failing to attain stages of the practice, and instability in maintaining a level of practice once attained. 1.31 From these obstacles, there are four other consequences that also arise, and these are: 1) mental or physical pain, 2) sadness or dejection, 3) restlessness, shakiness, or anxiety, and 4) irregularities in the exhalation and inhalation of breath. 1.32 To prevent or deal with these nine obstacles and their four consequences, the recommendation is to make the mind one-pointed, training it how to focus on a single principle or object. Stabilizing and clearing the mind (Yoga Sutras 1.33-1.39) 1.33 In relationships, the mind becomes purified by cultivating feelings of friendliness towards those who are happy, compassion for those who are suffering, goodwill towards those who are virtuous, and indifference or neutrality towards those we perceive as wicked or evil. 1.34 The mind is also calmed by regulating the breath, particularly attending to exhalation and the natural stilling of breath that comes from such practice. 1.35 The inner concentration on the process of sensory experiencing, done in a way that leads towards higher, subtle sense perception; this also leads to stability and tranquility of the mind. 1.36 Or concentration on a painless inner state of lucidness and luminosity also brings stability and tranquility. 1.37 Or contemplating on having a mind that is free from desires, the mind gets stabilized and tranquil. 1.38 Or by focusing on the nature of the stream in the dream state or the nature of the state of dreamless sleep, the mind becomes stabilized and tranquil. 1.39 Or by contemplating or concentrating on whatever object or principle one may like, or towards which one has a predisposition, the mind becomes stable and tranquil. Results of stabilizing the mind (Yoga Sutras 1.40-1.51) 1.40 When, through such practices, the mind develops the power of becoming stable on the smallest size object as well as on the largest, then the mind truly comes under control. 1.41 When the modifications of mind have become weakened, the mind becomes like a transparent crystal, and thus can easily take on the qualities of whatever object observed, whether that object be the observer, the means of observing, or an object observed, in a process of engrossment called samapatti. 1.42 One type of such an engrossment (samapatti) is one in which there is a mixture of three things, a word or name going with the object, the meaning or identity of that object, and the knowledge associated with that object; this engrossment is known as savitarka samapatti (associated with gross objects). 1.43 When the memory or storehouse of modifications of mind is purified, then the mind appears to be devoid of its own nature and only the object on which it is contemplating appears to shine forward; this type of engrossment is known as nirvitarka samapatti. 1.44 In the same way that these engrossments operate with gross objects in savitarka samapatti, the engrossment with subtle objects also operates, and is known as savichara and nirvichara samapatti. 1.45 Having such subtle objects extends all the way up to unmanifest prakriti. 1.46 These four varieties of engrossment are the only kinds of concentrations (samadhi) which are objective, and have a seed of an object. 1.47 As one gains proficiency in the undisturbed flow in nirvichara, a purity and luminosity of the inner instrument of mind is developed. 1.48 The experiential knowledge that is gained in that state is one of essential wisdom and is filled with truth. 1.49 That knowledge is different from the knowledge that is commingled with testimony or through inference, because it relates directly to the specifics of the object, rather than to those words or other concepts. 1.50 This type of knowledge that is filled with truth creates latent impressions in the mind-field, and those new impressions tend to reduce the formation of other less useful forms of habitual latent impressions. 1.51 When even these latent impressions from truth filled knowledge recede along with the other impressions, then there is objectless concentration.
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